Enigmatic Code

Programming Enigma Puzzles

2017 in review

Happy New Year from Enigmatic Code!

There are now 1,134 Enigma puzzles on the site, along with 35 from the Tantalizer series and 34 from the Puzzle series (and a few other puzzles that have caught my eye). There is a complete archive of Enigma puzzles published between January 1979 to September 1987, and from May 2000 up to the final Enigma puzzle in December 2013, which make up about 63.3% of all the Enigma puzzles published. Of the remaining 654 puzzles I have 152 left to source (numbers 891 – 1042).

In 2017, 105 Enigma puzzles were added to the site (and 30 Tantalizers and 28 Puzzles, so 163 puzzles in total). Here is my selection of the puzzles that I found most interesting to solve over the year:

Older Puzzles (from 1986 – 1987)

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Newer Puzzles (from 2000 – 2001)

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Other Puzzles

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I have continued to maintain the enigma.py library of useful routines for puzzle solving. In particular the SubstitutedExpression() solver and Primes() class have increased functionality, and I have added the ability to execute run files, in cases where a complete program is not required. The SubstitutedDivision() solver is now derived directly from the SubstitutedExpression() solver, and is generally faster and more functional than the previous implementation.

I’ve also starting putting my Python solutions up on repl.it, where you can execute the code without having to install a Python environment, and you can make changes to my code or write your own programs (but a free login is required if you want to save them).

Thanks to everyone who has contributed to the site in 2017, either by adding their own solutions (programmatic or analytical), insights or questions, or by helping me source puzzles from back-issues of New Scientist.

One response to “2017 in review

  1. Julian Gray 1 January 2018 at 2:18 pm

    I wonder how many others, like me, set up their lap-tops next to breakfast cereal and coffee on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays and then enjoy a few minutes or hours tackling Enigmas, Puzzles and Tantalisers. Such a lot of fun, and thank you.

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