Enigmatic Code

Programming Enigma Puzzles

Category Archives: puzzle

Puzzle 46: I lose my specs

 From New Scientist #1097, 6th April 1978 [link]

In the division sum below letters stand for different digits. But unfortunately I did not have my specs with me when I copied it out and discovered later that I had made a mistake. One letter was wrong on one of the occasions when it appeared.

Find the incorrect letter, and rewrite the sum with the letters replaced by digits.

[puzzle46]

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Puzzle 48: Verse on the island

From New Scientist #1099, 20th April 1978 [link]

We live, we three, on the Imperfect Isle,
Where all is not just what it ought to be.
One is a Wotta-Woppa and he never
Tells what is true, in fact a liar he.

And then there is another one who cannot
Make up his mind. Oh, shall I tell a lie?
He is a Shilli-Shalla, and makes statements,
One true, one false. But which? The constant cry.
The third one is a Pukka and we find
Nothing but truth comes from the third man’s mind.

Single figures all our dwellings,
And each one is different.
Three statements each, so read with care
And use your loaf to find what’s meant.

A:

(1) First let me say no Shilli-Shalla I,
But I’m afraid I cannot tell you why!
(2) Then I point out that where numbers are concerned
The lower the truer; that’s the fact for which you yearned.
(3) Thirdly, no tricks,
My number’s less than six.

B:

(1) and (2) A Pukka, I, and live at number one.
That’s two statements in a single line.
(3) Perfect, you might say, but not as perfect as C‘s square.

C:

(1) A and B live on either side of me.
(2) Who is the Wotta-Woppa? Why it’s B.
(3) And now our verse
Has done its worst.
Just to finish with a wink,
To get this right you’ll have to think.
And with a nod,
A‘s number is not odd.

Where do AB and C live and what are their tribes?

[puzzle48]

Puzzle 47: Digits all wrong

From New Scientist #1098, 13th April 1978 [link]

In the following addition all the digits are wrong. But the same wrong digit stands for the same correct digit wherever it appears, and the same correct digit [is] always represented by the same wrong digit.

Find the correct addition sum.

[puzzle47]

Puzzle 49: Division

From New Scientist #1100, 27th April 1978 [link]

In the following long division sum, some of the letters are missing and some of them are replaced by letters. The same letter stands for the same digit whenever it appears and different letters stand for different digits:

Write out the complete division sum.

[puzzle49]

Puzzle 50: Football and addition

From New Scientist #1101, 4th May 1978 [link]

In the following football table and addition sum, letters have been substituted for digits (from 0 to 9). The same letter stands for the same digit whenever it appears and different letters stand for different digits. The 3 teams are eventually going to play each other once — or perhaps they have already done so.

(Two points are given for a win and one point to each side in a drawn match).

Find the score in the football matches and write the addition sum out with numbers substituted for letters.

[puzzle50]

Puzzle 51: A multiplication

From New Scientist #1102, 11th May 1978 [link]

In the multiplication sum below digits have been replaced by letters. The same letter stands for the same digit wherever it appears, and different letters stand for different digits.

You are told that A is not greater than 5.

Find the digits for which the letters stand.

[puzzle51]

Puzzle 52: Football on the Island of Imperfection

From New Scientist #1103, 18th May 1978 [link]

There has been a great craze for football recently on the Island of Imperfection and I have been fortunate enough to get some details of games played there.

There are three tribes on the Island — the Pukkas, who always tell the truth; the Wotta-Woppas, who never tell the truth; and the Shilli-Shallas, who make statements which are alternately true and false, or false and true.

Three teams, one from each tribe, have been having a competition, in which eventually they will play each other [once] — or perhaps they have already done this. The secretaries of the three teams have been asked to give details of the number of matches played, won, lost and drawn and they do this in accordance with the rules of their tribe — so that, for example, all the figures given by the secretary of the Wotta-Woppa team will be wrong.

The figures given are as follows (calling the teams AB and C in no particular order):

(In no instance did a team win by a majority of more than three goals).

Find the tribe to which each of the three teams belong, and the score in each match.

[puzzle52]

Puzzle 53: Addition

From New Scientist #1104, 25th May 1978 [link]

In the following addition sum the digits have been replaced by letters. The same letter stands for the same digit wherever it appears and different letters stand for different digits.

Find the digits for which the letters stand.

[puzzle53]

Puzzle 54: Football

From New Scientist #1105, 1st June 1978 [link]

Three football teams — AB and C — are to play each other once. After some (or perhaps all) of the matches had been played, a table giving some details of the matches played, won, lost etc. looked like this:

(Two points are given for a win, and one point to each side in a drawn match).

Find the score in each match.

[puzzle54]

Puzzle 55: A division with all figures wrong

From New Scientist #1106, 8th June 1978 [link]

In the following, obviously incorrect, division sum the pattern is correct, but every single figure is wrong.

The correct division comes out exactly. The digits in the answer are only 1 out, but all the other digits may be incorrect by any amount.

Find the correct figures.

[puzzle55]

Puzzle 56: Addition

From New Scientist #1107, 15th June 1978 [link]

In the addition sum below with letters substituted for digits all is not as it should be. Uncle Bungle has been at it again, and one of the letters is incorrect. (Each letter should stand for the same digit wherever it appears and different letters should stand for different digits, and so they do except for the one wrong letter).

Find the mistake, and write out the correct addition sum.

[puzzle56]

Puzzle 57: Football letters for digits

From New Scientist #1108, 22nd June 1978 [link]

Four football teams (ABC and D) are to play each other once. After some of the matches had been played a table giving some details of the numbers won, lost, drawn, and so on was drawn up.

But unfortunately the digits have been replaced by letters. Each letter stands for the same digit (from 0 to 9) whenever it appears and different letters stand for different digits.

The table looks like this:

(Two points are given for a win and one point to each side in a drawn match).

Find the score in each match.

[puzzle57]

Puzzle 58: Letters for digits

From New Scientist #1109, 29th June 1978 [link]

In the following division sum each letter stands for a different digit. Rewrite the sum with the letters replaced by digits.

[puzzle58]

Puzzle 59: Cricket

From New Scientist #1110, 6th July 1978 [link]

ABC and D are having a cricket competition with each other in which eventually there are all going to play each other once. Points are awarded as follows:

To the side that wins: 10
To the side that wins on the first innings in a drawn match: 6
To the side that loses on the first innings in a drawn match: 2
To each side for a tie: 5
To the side that loses: 0

The latest news I have about their points is as follows:

21; 10; 9; 6.

Find the result of each match.

[puzzle59]

Puzzle 60: Uncle Bungle gets the last line wrong

From New Scientist #1111, 13th July 1978 [link]

“If you know what you are adding you should be able to add it”, said Uncle Bungle when I complained to him that though the first two lines of his addition sum were legible, the last line across was not. I can of course see what he means by this but he seems to forget that in his addition sum letters have been substituted for digits. The same letter stands for the same digit whenever it appears and different letters stand for different digits.

In the last line across Uncle went haywire and as four of the letters were illegible I have replaced them by blanks. The sum reads like this:

Find the correct addition sum (from the remark that Uncle made I gathered that in the final sum all 10 digits appear).

[puzzle60]

Puzzle 61: A division sum

From New Scientist #1112, 20th July 1978 [link]

Find the missing digits.

[puzzle61]

Puzzle 62: A cross number

From New Scientist #1113, 27th July 1978 [link]

Across:

1a. The digits are all even.
4a. Odd, and even when reversed.
5a. 19 is a factor of this.

Down:

1d. A perfect square.
2d. A perfect square when reversed.
3d. Each digit is 1 less than the one before.

(There are no 0’s).

[puzzle62]

Puzzle 63: One and one make two

From New Scientist #1114, 3rd August 1978 [link]

“Never tell them more than you need”, as Professor Knowall has so often said. “And pay them the compliment, my dear Sergeant Simple, of supposing that they are capable of putting one and one together to make two”.

As my readers will know, the professor, though he does not often have the time to turn his attention to anything other than crime, is very interested in football and likes making up and solving football puzzles. His remarks about putting one and one together to make two seemed rather silly to me at first, but I soon realised what he meant when he showed me the puzzle.

It was about four football teams, and gave some information concerning the number of matches played, won, lost and so on. But of the 24 pieces of information that one might have expected only 12 were given. One did indeed need to put one and one together to make two.

The information was as follows:

“That ought not to be too hard for you, my dear Sergeant”, he said, “but I must add also the information that not more than seven goals were scored in any match”.

I’m afraid it was too much for me, but I hope that the readers will be able to find out the score in each match.

(Each team is eventually going to play each other once).

[puzzle63]

Puzzle 64: Addition: digits all wrong

From New Scientist #1115, 10th August 1978 [link]

Each digit in the addition sum below is wrong. But the same wrong digit stands for the same correct digit wherever it appears, and the same correct digit is always represented by the same wrong digit.

Find the correct addition sum.

[puzzle64]

Puzzle 65: Division: figures all wrong

From New Scientist #1116, 17th August 1978 [link]

In the following, obviously incorrect, division sum the pattern is correct, but every single figure is wrong.

The correct division, of course, comes out exactly. All the digits in the answer are only 1 out, but all the other digits may be incorrect by any amount.

Find the correct figures.

[puzzle65]