Enigmatic Code

Programming Enigma Puzzles

Tag Archives: by: Eric Emmet

Puzzle 67: Addition: letters for digits

From New Scientist #1118, 31st August 1978 [link]

It is, I admit, a moot point whether it is better to guess at some of Uncle Bungle’s illegible letters and to hope for the best, or just to leave them out. For some time now I have guessed, but I must admit that my guessing is not what it was, so in this sum anything that is illegible has just been left out. Letters stand for digits, and the same letter stands for the same digit whenever it appears, and different letters stand for different digits. In the final sum all the digits from 0-9 are included.

Write out the correct addition sum.

[puzzle67]

Enigma 410: Most right

From New Scientist #1560, 14th May 1987 [link]

The addition sums which Uncle Bungle has been making up recently, with letters substituted for digits, have been getting longer and more complicated. And no one will be surprised to hear that in the latest one everything is not as it should be. In fact one of the letters is wrong.

Here it is:

What can you say about the letter which is wrong? What should it be? Find the correct sum.

[enigma410]

Puzzle 68: Football and addition: letters for digits

From New Scientist #1119, 7th September 1978 [link]

In the following football table and addition sum letters have been substituted for digits (from 0 to 9). The same letter stands for the same digit wherever it appears and different letters stand for different digits. The three teams are eventually going to play each other once — or perhaps they have already done so.

(Two points are given for a win and one point to each side in a drawn match).

Find the scores in the football matches and write out the addition sum with numbers substituted for letters.

[puzzle68]

Puzzle 69: Division: letters for digits

From New Scientist #1120, 14th September 1978 [link]

For some reason Uncle Bungle does not like divisors. This has been left out in the latest division sum which he has produced with letters substituted for digits. Here it is:

Find the divisor and all the digits of the sum.

[puzzle69]

Enigma 405: Uncle bungles the answer

From New Scientist #1555, 9th April 1987 [link]

It is true, of course, that there are rather a lot of letters in this puzzle, but despite that I though that for once Uncle Bungle was going to write it out correctly. In fact there was no mistake until the answer but in that, I’m afraid, one of the letters was incorrect.

This is another addition sum with letters substituted for digits. Each letter stands for the same digit whenever it appears, and different letters stand for different digits. Or at least they should, and they do, but for the mistake in the last line across.

Enigma 405

Which letter is wrong?

Write out the correct addition sum.

Note: This is a corrected version of Enigma 401.

[enigma405]

Enigma 401: Uncle bungles the answer

From New Scientist #1551, 12th March 1987 [link]

It is true, of course, that there are rather a lot of letters in this puzzle, but despite that I though that for once Uncle Bungle was going to write it out correctly. In fact there was no mistake until the answer but in that, I’m afraid, one of the letters was incorrect.

This is another addition sum with letters substituted for digits. Each letter stands for the same digit whenever it appears, and different letters stand for different digits. Or at least they should, and they do, but for the mistake in the last line across.

Enigma 401

Which letter is wrong?

Write out the correct addition sum.

As it stands the puzzle has no solution. New Scientist published the following correction with Enigma 404:

Correction to Enigma 401, “Uncle bungles the answer”. Unfortunately, as a result of a printer’s error, New Scientist managed to bungle the question. We will publish the correct question, in full, in our issue of 9 April, as Enigma 405. In the meantime, our apologies to those who were thwarted by the mistake.

[enigma401]

Puzzle 70: Football five teams: new method

From New Scientist #1121, 21st September 1978 [link]

The new method of rewarding goals scored in football matches goes from strength to strength. In this method 10 points are given for a win, 5 points for a draw and 1 point for each goal scored. Once can get some idea of the success of the method from the fact that in the latest competition between 5 teams, when some of the matches had been played, each team had scored at least 1 goal in every match. They are eventually going to play each other once.

The points were as follows:

A   11
B    8
C   12
D    5
E   43

Not more than 9 goals were scored in any match.

What was the score in each match?

[puzzle70]

Puzzle 71: All wrong, all wrong

From New Scientist #1122, 28th September 1978 [link]

A couple of one’s, a couple of two’s and a six;
All wrong, all wrong!

If only I thought that the puzzle was one I could fix,
I’d sing a song.

But as I feel sure that it’s rather too much for me,
My voice is muted.

Uncle Bungle’s my name and I fear that you must agree,
I’m rather stupid.

So please, I implore,
Continue the fight,
With tooth and with claw,
With main and with might,
To make wrong sums right.

puzzle-71

The figures given are all incorrect. Write out the whole division sum.

[puzzle71]

Puzzle 72: Addition: letters for digits

From New Scientist #1123, 5th October 1978 [link]

In the addition sum below, letters have been substituted for digits. The same latter stands for the same digit whenever it appears and different letters stand for different digits.

Write the sum out with numbers substituted for letters.

[puzzle72]

Enigma 397: All wrong again

From New Scientist #1547, 12th February 1987 [link]

In the following addition sum all the digits are wrong. But the same wrong digit stands for the same correct digit wherever it appears, and the same correct digit is always represented by the same wrong digit.

Find the correct addition sum.

[enigma397]

Puzzle 73: A division sum. Find the missing digits

From New Scientist #1124, 12th October 1978 [link]

puzzle-73

[puzzle73]

Puzzle 74: Football (three teams, old method)

From New Scientist #1125, 19th October 1978 [link]

Three football teams (AB and C) are to play each other once. After some — or perhaps all — the matches had been played, a table giving some details of goals, and so on, looked like this:

puzzle-74

Two points are given for a win and one point to each side in a drawn match.

Find the score in each match.

[puzzle74]

Enigma 392: Nothing written right

From New Scientist #1542, 8th January 1987 [link]

In the following addition sum all the digits are wrong. But the same wrong digit stands for the same correct digit wherever it appears, and the same correct digit is always represented by the same wrong digit.

Find the correct addition sum.

[enigma392]

Puzzle 75: C is silent

From New Scientist #1126, 26th October 1978 [link]

The four tribes seem now, for better or worse, to be firmly established on the Island of Imperfection. They are the Pukkas, who always tell the truth; the Wotta-Woppas, who never tell the truth; the Shilla-Shallas, who make statements which are alternately true and false or false and true; and the Jokers, whose rules for truth-telling in making three statements are any rules that are different from those of any of the other three tribes.

In the story which I have to tell about ABC and D there is one member of each tribe. C, I am afraid, does not actually say anything. Can he just be fed-up? I don’t blame him. The other three speak as follows:

A: B is a Pukka;
B: C is a Shilla-Shalla;
D: A is a Pukka;
D: I am a Shilla-Shalla or a Wotta-Woppa;
D: B is a Joker.

Find the tribes to which ABC and D belong.

[puzzle75]

Puzzle 76: Addition: letters for digits (one letter wrong)

From New Scientist #1127, 2nd November 1978 [link]

Below is an addition sum with letters substituted for digits. The same letter should stand for the same digit wherever it appears, and different letters should stand for different digits. Unfortunately, however, there has been a mistake and in the third line across one of the letters is incorrect. The sum looks like this:

Which letter was wrong? What should it be? Write out the correct addition sum.

[puzzle76]

Puzzle 77: Letters for digits: a multiplication

From New Scientist #1128, 9th November 1978 [link]

In the multiplication sum below the digits have been replaced by letters. The same letter stands for the same digit whenever it appears, and different letters stand for different digits.

Write the sum out with letters replaced by digits.

[puzzle77]

Enigma 389: Missing, presumed …?

From New Scientist #1537, 11th December 1986 [link]

In the following division sum, some of the digits are missing and some are replaced by letters. The same letter stands for the same digit wherever it appears. The digits in the answer are all different.

Find the correct sum.

[enigma389]

Puzzle 78: Football: new method

From New Scientist #1129, 16th November 1978 [link]

Three teams, AB and C are all to play each other once at football. 10 points are given for a win, 5 points for a draw and 1 point for each goal scored whatever the result of the match. After some, or perhaps all, the matches have been played the points were as follows:

A   21
B   20
C    4

Not more than 6 goals were scored in any match.

What was the score in each match?

[puzzle78]

Puzzle 79: Division: some letters for digits, some digits missing

From New Scientist #1130, 23rd November 1978 [link]

In the following division sum most of the digits are missing, but some are replaced by letters. The same letters stand for the same digit whenever it appears:puzzle-79

Find the correct sum.

[puzzle79]

Enigma 385: A multiletteral problem

From New Scientist #1534, 13th November 1986 [link]

In the following multiplication sum letters have been substituted for most of the digits.

enigma-385

Write out the whole multiplication sum.

[enigma385]